Category Archives: Resumes

212 Inc. Travels To Miami For A Combination of Business, Fun and Giving Back

Executives of 212 Inc. will be traveling to Miami Beach for an annual national conference and a bit of fun on the beach.

The weekend will be hosted at the Miami Eden Roc hotel and will include some brief meetings, a chance to relax on the beach, networking opportunities with several business professionals from all across the country, and two charity tournaments.

This year’s charity events will include a beach volleyball tournament and a beach cornhole tournament.   These tournaments mark the 5th year the company will be attending a charity event at the client hosted national conference. 

This years charity will be a Beach Volleyball Tournament followed by a Beach Cornhole
Tournament.  Teams of six for volleyball pay an entry fee of $100 and each team of 2 for cornhole pay a $20 entry fee.  One hundred percent of the entry fees collected will be
donated to Operation Smile and the winning team will have the honor of presenting the donation check to Operation.

Congratulations to those hard working individuals who have earned the opportunity to attend this fun filled weekend.

Leadership lessons from Olympics by Dinesh Weerakkody

http://www.dailymirror.lk/business/features/21327-leadership-lessons-from-olympics.html

By Dinesh Weerakkody
 
With a little British pomp and a lot of British pop, London brought the curtain down on a glorious Olympic Games to a close. However, it was some of the great athletes at those games more than the pomp and the pop that really made a lasting impression on everyone by doing things out of the ordinary.
Many of us were inspired by each story that was covered, and impressed by athletes who overcame incredible odds to make it to the games. No matter what industry you are in, there are valuable lessons from the Olympics that we can apply to our businesses.
For example, when Usain Bolt crossed the finish line during his 200-meter final, he made one simple gesture. He didn’t point to the sky. He didn’t raise his hands in the air. Bolt merely held up his finger to his lips, making a gesture of silence to his opposition. He’d reached a new pinnacle in his career and his first reaction was to silence those who thought he’d never make it.
Although Usain Bolt could be seen as arrogant and full of himself, his actual performance matched his level of self- confidence. As a result, he is now become a legend.
Just as Bolt excels in sprinting, there are champions in every profession and business. It’s the difference between one who simply gets the job done vs. someone who gets the job done incredibly well, makes a lasting impression and also a big difference to the final outcome.
While there are dozens of things leaders can learn from the Olympics, the following lessons can help to strengthen our organisations.
Lessons
Leadership research says that learning agility is the largest predictor of long-term success. Great athletes are great learners. Learning and improvement are often about the small and simple things, great sprinters are very analytical about all kinds of little things – their start, stride, footwear, clothing, etc. Learning ideas become shared over time. Learning can be defined as the ability to generate and generalize ideas.
Once a sprinter has innovated something new, then those ideas will likely to be transferred to others. Leaders learn by both doing new things and by learning from others. Then some ability to success is learnable, some are inherent.
The best sprinters in the world have great abilities to learn, but they also have natural ability. Therefore, it is important to position people in jobs where their talents are more applicable and relevant to the role.
Sense of pride
The spirit of the Olympics brings out the best in most of the athletes. Many of those great athletes are so committed to their craft that they invest more than 10,000s of hours in improving their skill, confidence and also to make the most of their own potential. Success therefore is talent plus preparation and it seems the bigger the role preparation plays over talent in the final outcome.
Also, many of the successful athletes while they feel a sense of pride in the sport, they also have a huge sense of pride in representing their country.
Likewise, companies need to invest time and resources to create that sense of pride within their organisations, to ensure that their employees do their best work for the company and also to help their employees to realize their full potential.

Standing out in a Tough Job Market

Standing out in a Tough Job Market

Any employer recruiting right now will tell you, one job posting equates to around 100 resumes flooding your inbox. So how can you stand out? What will grab an employer’s attention?

1. Make sure your file can be opened. I would be willing to bet that most places do have Microsoft, but just in case save your resume in .rtf. I know my new laptop is equipped with Vista and word 2007, but I have yet to upgrade all the computers of the office…

2. Have a professional email. It’s hard for me to take someone seriously if their email looks like something that should have been sent to my spam mail. Your_name@gmail.com is a good start.

2. Keep your resume simple and efficient. One page is about all that can keep my attention – this is especially important for someone who has just graduated or has had a wide variety of experience. Employer’s look for transferable skills, so list relevant work experience. Showcase the skills you have that an employer would find valuable to their specific field.

4. Proof Read. Don’t rely on spell check alone – it doesn’t have an option for “does this sound intelligent.” Reread and reread and have everyone you know read.

5. Key words and design. Many employers or staffing agency’s pull resumes into a database. If you are applying to a job that has a list of qualifications and responsibilities try using the same language to describe your past accomplishments. Your contact information should be together at the top so a “grabber” tool can easily file all of your information.

Should I send a cover letter?
My opinion? Yes. A cover letter lets me know that someone has done some research on the company and wants to be noticed. It should be kept simple, but supply a good introduction and highlight why you and the employer would specifically be a match. If you are applying for something outside your past experience or education or you are relocating, this is where I would give the explanation.

There are plenty of resources online for writing resumes and cover letters for all levels of experience and industries. It’s hard enough if you don’t have a ton of experience or educational background, so don’t catch yourself getting disqualified for something simple and controllable.

Standing out in a Tough Job Market

Standing out in a Tough Job Market

Any employer recruiting right now will tell you, one job posting equates to around 100 resumes flooding your inbox. So how can you stand out? What will grab an employer’s attention?

1. Make sure your file can be opened. I would be willing to bet that most places do have Microsoft, but just in case save your resume in .rtf. I know my new laptop is equipped with Vista and word 2007, but I have yet to upgrade all the computers of the office…

2. Have a professional email. It’s hard for me to take someone seriously if their email looks like something that should have been sent to my spam mail. Your_name@gmail.com is a good start.

2. Keep your resume simple and efficient. One page is about all that can keep my attention – this is especially important for someone who has just graduated or has had a wide variety of experience. Employer’s look for transferable skills, so list relevant work experience. Showcase the skills you have that an employer would find valuable to their specific field.

4. Proof Read. Don’t rely on spell check alone – it doesn’t have an option for “does this sound intelligent.” Reread and reread and have everyone you know read.

5. Key words and design. Many employers or staffing agency’s pull resumes into a database. If you are applying to a job that has a list of qualifications and responsibilities try using the same language to describe your past accomplishments. Your contact information should be together at the top so a “grabber” tool can easily file all of your information.

Should I send a cover letter?
My opinion? Yes. A cover letter lets me know that someone has done some research on the company and wants to be noticed. It should be kept simple, but supply a good introduction and highlight why you and the employer would specifically be a match. If you are applying for something outside your past experience or education or you are relocating, this is where I would give the explanation.

There are plenty of resources online for writing resumes and cover letters for all levels of experience and industries. It’s hard enough if you don’t have a ton of experience or educational background, so don’t catch yourself getting disqualified for something simple and controllable.